The Adventures of Poor Frank, Part CLXXIV: A Taste of Disneyland

The Adventures of Poor Frank, Part CLXXIV: A Taste of Disneyland

By Ray Adams
frankandarchie@yahoo.com

  Lucky Archie had just gotten back from a trip to Disneyland, and he was more than ready to play some hot bridge.

 

 

 

Poor Frank chose to open his hand with a four spade bid and this ended the auction. West led the ace of diamonds, Lucky Archie dropping his stiff jack. West continued with the king of diamonds, and the Lucky One began a high low signal in clubs, playing the eight of clubs on this trick. West persisted with the queen of diamonds and Lucky Archie fondled the four of clubs, knowing that his signal in this suit would get West to make the club switch and set the contract.

But as Lucky Archie played with the little eight, the ace of clubs fell from his hand and landed face up on the table. At first Archie did not notice his blunder, but when he saw his partner’s eyes get as big as ocean liners, he glanced down. To his horror, he saw the card that would down the contract lying uselessly on the table.

Archie’s heart sank like a ship struck by an iceberg as he realized that his carelessness would allow Poor Frank to make an impossible contract and beat him out for that evening’s laurels.   West now saw that a club shift was futile and continued with a diamond, hoping that his careless partner would be able to overruff dummy. So, even though Poor Frank ruffed this trick with the ten of spades, Lucky Archie overruffed with the king and set the contract.

“Most Souths made four spades on this hand,” Poor Frank said to Janet later. “They ruffed the club switch and the king of spades was in the slot. I was the only one to go down.”

“You know what I think, darling?” Janet said. “I think Archie never left the Magical Kingdom. That play is truly worthy of a fantasy world.”

“So if Lucky Archie is Goofy, does that make me Mickey Mouse?”

“No, darling,” Janet said laughing, “you’re more like Scrooge McDuck. He hates to lose money. You hate to lose boards.”

This entry was posted in bridge friends, Bridge Hands, Bridge Humor, Bridge Rivalries, Fiction, Humor, Stories, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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